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ORIGIN: Sebago was released by the USDA and the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station in 1938. It is one of the progeny of a cross between Chippewa and Katahdin, and was tested as USDA seedling 4488.

CHARACTERISTICS: In the Great Lakes and Northeast Regions, Sebago is a very late maturing variety. It has medium to high yield potential, and was released primarily for its moderate field resistance to late blight. In addition to its adaptation to the Northeast, it has been grown in southern production areas as a table and chipstock variety. Plants are large, erect or spreading. Stems are thick, prominently angled, nodes slightly swollen and green; internodes are reddish-purple. Leaves are medium in length, broad and open. Leaflets are broadly ovate, large and dark green. Corolla is medium sized, reddish purple (and white-flowered sports are common), anthers are orange-yellow with scant pollen with poor fertility. Tubers are elliptical to round, medium-thick with a smooth ivory skin. Specific gravity is medium to low. Tuber dormancy is short.

STRENGTHS & WEAKNESSES: Sebago is resistant to net necrosis and wart and has moderate resistance to early and late blight, southern bacterial wilt, PVX, PVY, PVA and some resistance to scab. The variety is highly susceptible to blackleg. It has wide adaptability; however, its late maturity in the Northeast is a limitation. When grown in the south, the variety’s maturity is considered medium-late. Tubers grown under good conditions are attractive but are susceptible to prominent lenticels under wet conditions.